Maison Belle Epoque

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Welcome  to
the MAISON
BELLE EPOQUE

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A DOOR OPENS, REVEALING A WORLD OF GRACE,
BEAUTY AND REFINEMENT.

A world where the past is honoured, the present celebrated, and the future embraced. A world where nature inspires art, and art transforms nature. Welcome to the world of Maison Perrier-Jouët. Welcome to the Maison Belle Epoque.

Within these four walls, the story of two houses unfolds. The story, first of all, of Maison Perrier-Jouët, founded in 1811 by the marriage of Pierre-Nicolas Perrier and Rose-Adélaïde Jouët, who united their twin passions for art and nature into a unique vision of champagne. The story, too, of a family home, occupied by generations of their descendants, whose own passions and personalities shaped the house, its art collection, its gardens and the cellars over which it is built.

Opening its doors once more after painstaking restoration, the Maison Belle Epoque today is the vibrant expression, not only of Maison Perrier-Jouët’s 200-year heritage, but also of its enduring philosophy. Here, in these tranquil and intimate surroundings, extraordinary savoir-faire is dedicated to exceptional savoir-vivre, while art and nature combine to bring beauty and wonder to everyday life…

“Restored to its original beauty and integrity, the Maison Belle Epoque is the living symbol of Maison Perrier-Jouët. Home to successive generations of the founding family, it not only represents a unique vision of savoir-faire and savoir-vivre, but also an immediate connection to champagne.”
Timothée Croizat, Perrier-Jouët Marketing Director

ImagininG the Maison
Belle Epoque

- PART 1 -

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From the family home…

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FOR ALMOST AS LONG AS MAISON PERRIER-JOUËT HAS EXISTED, WHAT IS NOW THE MAISON BELLE EPOQUE HAS BEEN ITS FAMILY HOME.

The elegant mansion, built in the late 18th century, was acquired in 1850 by Eugène Gallice, brother-in-law of Charles Perrier, the son of the founders. Charles himself was planning the construction, next door, of his own residence – the imposing Château Perrier, in whose gardens he built vast greenhouses to indulge his passion for botany.

Eugène Gallice was an art lover, a collector of paintings and drawings, and a founding member of the French Art History Society. It was an interest he passed on to his sons Henri and Octave. While Henri managed Maison Perrier-Jouët, his younger brother spent much of his time in Paris, sharing in the excitement of the “Belle Epoque”. He was a friend of many in the artistic avant-garde, so it was only natural that he asked Emile Gallé, one of the pioneers of the French Art Nouveau movement, to create a design for Perrier-Jouët champagne. Accordingly, four magnums enamelled with a delicate spray of Japanese white anemones were delivered in 1902, inspiring an exceptional cuvée that would later be renowned the world over as Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque.

… to the Maison Belle Epoque

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THROUGHOUT SUBSEQUENT DECADES,

the mansion continued to open its doors to friends of Maison Perrier-Jouët. When Michel Budin, a relative of the Gallice family and a collector of Art Nouveau, took over the business, he had a glorious vision – to transform the house into a celebration of savoir-faire and savoir-vivre, uniting once and for all the wonders of art and nature. The Maison Belle Epoque was born.

“The Maison Belle Epoque is an invitation to a certain art de vivre, to a moment suspended in time, a moment beyond time. It is an invitation to savour, not only champagne, but all the refinement that goes with it.”
Timothée Croizat, Perrier-Jouët Marketing Director

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Revealing the Maison Belle Epoque

- PART 2 -

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An evocation of art and nature

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THE METICULOUS RESTORATION HAS NOT ONLY RETURNED THE MAISON BELLE EPOQUE TO ITS ORIGINAL INTEGRITY, BUT ALSO RE-ENVISIONED THE WORKS OF ART WITHIN IT.

The house contains the largest private collection of French Art Nouveau in Europe, encompassing exceptional pieces by the movement’s leading exponents, yet it is much more than a museum. Its vocation is to be lived in, to be experienced – just as it was by generations of the founding family, and as it will be by the guests of Maison Perrier-Jouët. Throughout the Maison Belle Epoque, art and nature combine in a vibrant, harmonious ensemble, reflecting the passions of the founders, the inspiration of the Art Nouveau movement, and Maison Perrier-Jouët’s unique vision of champagne.

 
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A stroll through the house

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STEP INSIDE THE MAISON BELLE EPOQUE, AND THE IMPRESSION THAT GREETS YOU IS ONE OF LIGHTNESS AND LIGHT.

Hector Guimard’s slender pear wood doors, with their sinuous botanical motifs, seem to beckon you into the petit salon, where a stained glass window offers a glimpse of the garden beyond – here, nature is never far away. In the centre of the room, a walnut table by Emile Gallé is supported by three delicately carved dragonflies, one of the favourite motifs of the creator of the iconic Perrier-Jouët anemones. Gracing the mantelpiece is Auguste Rodin’s L’Eternel Printemps. The sole non-Art Nouveau work in the collection, the bronze sculpture of two lovers embracing was presented to Henri Gallice by his employees to celebrate the centenary of Maison Perrier-Jouët.

With its harmony of satin textures and soft pastel shades, the salon Majorelle is the ideal place to relax while admiring one of the Maison Belle Epoque’s most outstanding pieces – an ensemble of armchairs, sofa and banquette by Louis Majorelle with a décor of ferns in carved, gilded beech. On the marble mantelpiece, a rare work by François-Rupert Carabin relates an amusing anecdote: having taken a dislike to the blue Sèvres crystal vase presented to him by the President of France, the artist sculpted a pear wood base with three female nudes turning their heads away in horror. Years later, he would delight in recounting the President’s reaction!

Here, too, are two works that epitomize the spirit of the “Belle Epoque”: a ceramic plaque by Toulouse-Lautrec with a portrait of Yvette Guilbert, on which the singer scrawled a humorous response, and – the most recent addition to the collection – an exquisite gilded bronze lamp by Raoul Larche depicting Loïe Fuller dancing.

Upstairs now, where an elegant corridor leads to the bedrooms. In the chambre Guimard, cool blue tones, interspersed with touches of gold, create a serene and restful ambiance. The bed, by Hector Guimard, is a masterpiece of perfect proportion and refined decoration, while the en suite bathroom has preserved some of its original features, including a charming Art Nouveau screen.

From here, take the stairs down to the Cuir de Cordoue dining room, where guests of Maison Perrier-Jouët will enjoy gourmet dishes paired with a selection of Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque cuvées. With its striking wall panels ornamented with motifs of lilies, irises, thistles and chestnut leaves, the room reflects the Art Nouveau movement’s renewal of the decorative arts through its diversity of techniques, in this case the ancient North African craft of embossed and gilded leather. On a side table is Louis-Ernest Barrias’ allegorical sculpture of Nature revealing herself to Science, executed in a combination of precious materials including ivory, gilded bronze and lapis lazuli.

A dialogue with contemporary DESIGN AND CREATION

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FOR MORE THAN TWO CENTURIES, MAISON PERRIER-JOUËT HAS BEEN INSPIRED BY ART AND NATURE AND THE ASSOCIATION ENDURES TODAY THROUGH REGULAR COLLABORATION WITH LEADING CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS.

Symbolizing this continuity, two contemporary works take their place in the Maison Belle Epoque alongside the Art Nouveau collection. In the entrance hall, Ephemera by Mischer’Traxler is a modern allegory of the relationship between man and nature. It represents an ornamental garden which grows from a long table, then disappears as if by magic when anyone approaches, eliciting an almost childlike sense of curiosity and wonder.

All’ombra della luce by Japanese artist Ritsue Mishima was inspired by the rhythm of the seasons in the vineyards and the half-light of the cellars where the miracle of champagne unfolds. Suspended from the ceiling of the bar, her transparent Murano glass disks sparkle like bubbles of champagne, providing the perfect setting for an aperitif. A glass of legendary Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque Brut, perhaps, or else crystalline Perrier-Jouët Blanc de Blancs? Nothing could be more simple – a few steps away is a flight of stairs leading to the house’s own private cellar… and, beyond that, to the untold treasures of Maison Perrier-Jouët!

“The renovation of the Maison Belle Epoque was an inspiring project, bringing together a vast array of different talents – the talent of our Cellar Master, the talents of the artists whose work fills the house, the talents of the artisans who restored it and the architect who envisioned the project from beginning to end.”
Axelle de Buffevent, Perrier-Jouët Style Director

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